Men Don’t Rape

Rapists rape. Some rapists happen to be male and others happen to be female. Most of them understand that what they are doing is wrong. They’ve been told that they have no right to another person’s body and they don’t care. They are beyond education.

Treating men as if they are all rapists is disgusting and wrong. The vast majority of men don’t need to be taught not to rape because they aren’t rapists. And rapists can’t be taught.

Rapists can only be avoided, resisted, and punished. That is not blaming the victim. Doing otherwise is enabling the perpetrator.

You want to teach rapists not to rape? Great! Let’s start by promoting an environment where we respect each other as autonomous human beings with rights and privileges to our own bodies. Oh but you can’t stop there. Let’s talk about consent and how it’s not really consent where there is coercion. See? No victim blaming here. For the vast majority of people, we’re done. In a perfect world, that’s all we’d need.

You’re right, I should be able to take a nap in a dark alley while naked. It’s not fair that I can’t and it’s not my fault either. But that’s not the world we will in. We share our lives with a subset of monsters. Not the kind we imagine live under the bed, but those that look just like the rest of us. Why not go chat with Peter about rape culture? Hmm

So let’s continue our education of the rapists, shall we?

Now, let’s teach them that there are dire consequences for violating another human being. Consequences up to and including death to the perpetrator of such actions.

Court systems and law enforcement can only play a small role here. No, the consequences must happen as an immediate effect when warranted. In order to do that, people must be willing and able to protect their own body autonomy with force sufficient to overwhelm the attacker. The rapist has already failed to learn the lesson of respect for their fellow human beings so let’s appeal to a more primitive drive: fear.

I don’t want to live in fear of rapists. I want them to live in fear of a victim that will fight back and deliver swift justice for their crimes. I want them afraid for their very lives.

And here ends the lesson.

Michael Z Williamson has an excellent piece on the matter.

Defensive Gun Use

I may have told this story before, but today’s entry over at Hell in a Handbasket got me thinking about it again. I think I might just have more words about it or at least some lessons learned. And hey! Content! I am ostensibly a blogger, after all.

James shares a story of his recent defensive gun use, and it has several things in common with the one and only time I have ever gone for my handgun for anything other than training or practice. Go read it.

Like his encounter, mine was with a dog and ultimately, no shots were fired. Unlike his story, mine does not include injury and medical treatment. Good for me, bad for James, but he’s going to be alright.

A couple of dogs had gotten loose in my neighborhood. I had successfully wrangled one of them and put it in the backyard and was very carefully attempting to corral the other. I’ve done this countless times with many different dogs without issue and assumed the chocolate lab would be no different. For those playing along at home, this is what we call the first mistake, and thankfully the only one. Unfamiliar animals have a tendency to act in unpredictable ways.

I held out my left hand in a non-threatening way and encouraged the dog to approach me, which she did very cautiously. (Left hand because I am right-handed and that allowed me easy access to the snub nosed revolver holstered on my hip that day. I may have been overly assuming, but I was not stupid or unprepared.) The dog sniffed my hand and visibly relaxed. She even allowed me to pet her head. This seemed like my opportunity to slowly crouch down to inspect her collar for identification.

It was at that point that her demeanor did a complete 180. She went from frightened but calm to a mass of teeth and snarls. I jumped back and shouted something forceful (I have no idea what I said). I made multiple observations, calculations, and decisions in that moment. I observed that there were no kids playing in the street that day. I decided that should she lunge at me, my choices would be to shoot her or be attacked. I pivoted on my left foot ever so slightly so as to have a solid backstop if it came to that (down into the yard). I raised my left arm so it was between the dog and my face. I’d far prefer to be bitten on the arm than the face and the corduroy jacket would have mitigated some injury . I swept my right hand back brushing aside my jacket and gaining a solid grip on my handgun. James noted about how time compresses, and I found that to be true. All of that happened in a matter of seconds.

And lunge she did. She raised up on her hind legs and just as I was beginning to draw, she dropped back down and ran away. It was over. I pushed the revolver back into the holster and made certain she was really gone before taking a deep breath and assessing the situation. I don’t know if she just sensed that my aggression was bigger than hers and decided to back down or if she heard her owner arrive home. Her behavior was more erratic than any dog I’ve dealt with before or since. All I knew is that thankfully, I didn’t have to shoot a dog in my own front yard that day.

A couple of points I want to highlight. It’s important to be aware of all threats, not just the two legged variety. And also that this didn’t happen in the ‘bad’ part of town. It happened in my front yard. My castle, if you will. The place I should be able to let my guard down. Yes, I carry at home. Finally, I’ve been carrying a firearm on my hip for over 5 years. I’ve been in several heated arguments in that time (one with the owner of said dog. Now I know where the erratic behavior comes from), plenty of road rage incidents, and had some crazy woman get in my face threatening to ‘kick my ass’ even, and yet, the one and only time I’ve reached for it was when there was a clear and present threat of severe bodily harm. From a dog. I know, I totally fail at the whole trigger happy gun nut thing.

And again, no shots fired so it will never count as an official defensive gun use. I didn’t even get fully drawn, so it’s not even brandishing territory.

Andrew Branca on Stand Your Ground

This is perfect. Andrew Branca of Law of Self Defense recently debated Stand Your Ground at UC Berkeley. Here are his opening remarks.

Honestly, there is nothing more to be said here. He explained it clearly and succinctly, and in my opinion, won the debate before it even started.

If you care about self defense and the laws surrounding it*, you should be following Andrew Branca.

*This should include roughly 150% of my readership.

Not So Smart Gun

A Facebook friend brought this bit of tech to my attention.

The Armatix Smart System includes a watch and a gun, and the firearm will only work when it is within RFID range of the user’s watch. (Credit: Armatix).

 

Interesting? Sure, but I wouldn’t have one. Really, it brings up more questions than answers.

First off, I want to know what happens when the batteries die. Does the system lock up making your firearm a fancy looking club? What if there is some kind of interference?

And what is the range on that RFID? Anti-gun types often like to trot out the idea that a criminal will just take your gun and use it against you. I would assume that anyone that was close enough to snag your heater would still be within RFID range. Or is the range so short that I would have to be wearing the watch on the hand I was using to shoot the gun? I wear my watch on my left hand and generally shoot right-handed although I can shoot left-handed as well. What happens if I need to use the opposite hand?

I suppose if it works exactly as advertised, it would add a bit of security in the situation of a stolen gun, but that only lasts as long as it takes to hack the thing.

Or maybe it’s supposed to provide peace of mind when you leave a loaded gun on your nightstand. Bet Kendra St. Clair’s mom is glad she wasn’t using one of these. You can’t substitute technology for training. Teach your children to be safe around guns, and take the necessary precautions that fit your situation. No matter what 20/20 says, you probably know best how to keep your children safe. There is no one size fits all.

And finally, putting this technology out there does nothing to prevent crime of any sort. It’s just another marketing gimmick to separate naïve people from their money. Worse than that, it’s another place for some gung-ho legislator to hang their pet cause. Even if this worked perfectly, you can’t snap your fingers and make every firearm out there complaint any more than you can make all the icky guns disappear with a signature.

I wouldn’t want to live in a world where you could. You see, the world would be a far, far scarier place without firearms. Eliminating them would only serve to cripple the weak. Brute force would win the day. I do not want to live in a world where the most vulnerable among us are deprived of an equalizer against those bent on violence. You have to wonder about the true motivations of those calling for just that.

I Do So Love a Happy Ending

Man pulls gun on lady. Lady phones a friend. Man attempts to rob salon. Gets a beat down and finds himself naked and locked out of the salon looking like this

perp

That’s right. That’s how we roll in Oklahoma.

BWAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!

*breathe*

BWAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!

Read the story over at Kevin’s place. Looks like one of the intended victims had an ‘Awe hell no’ moment.

Quote of the Day

Ok, I’m actually stealing borrowing Daddy Bear’s quote of the day

It isn’t the weapon that’s the dangerous part of any equation.  It’s the person holding it.

I am not dangerous because I carry a gun.  Not to the standard, every-day, law-abiding schmuck.

I am dangerous to those who think that I am prey.  Because I am not, and have never been.

–Heroditus Huxley, “It’s Not The Weapon

Which goes right along with Tam’s conversation with a polite anti.

You see, I, and many others like me, pose no danger to anyone. Gun or no gun. In fact, I have never had cause to use my firearm against anyone. (Arguably, the wind did a little brandishing for me once.)

I will not hesitate to answer violence with violence, but I will never be the one to introduce it. Back in my daycare years, I did black an eye, possibly break a nose, and introduce a boy’s groin to my knee, but that was after he broke the little finger on my left hand. You introduce the violence; I am not inclined to fight fair. Thankfully, teachers were still allowed to apply common sense back then, and all I got out of the incident was sympathy, an ice pack, and a call to my parents so I could get medical attention. He got in trouble. My finger is still crooked, but he never messed with me again.

I carry a firearm because it is the most effective means of stopping violence, not to inflict it. I am not naive enough to believe that I could still answer an attack the way I could on the playground so many years ago. The bad guys and bullies are much bigger now. And there aren’t any teachers ready to intervene.

 

Boredom

When I was a kid, the phrase “I’m bored” wasn’t a wise one to use around the house. For you see, there was always laundry to do, weeds to pull, floors to sweep or vacuum. Didn’t take much of that to figure out that I could find some form of entertainment. Books trump chores any day. Bike rides are far more interesting than dusting.

And yet, in all my efforts in addressing boredom, never once did if occur to me to commit murder. I suppose I had every opportunity to do so, but no.That’s not to say I didn’t get into plenty of mischief, but nothing that could have resulted in a felony charge. Although, it’s not even the threat of punishment that has ever kept murder off my mind. You could strike every law from the books and I would still find the idea of taking human life absolutely abhorrent. Thing is, that doesn’t make me special. I would imagine that the majority of people feel the same way.

Except for those that do not. The senseless murder of Christopher Lane is a grim reminder that there is evil out there. Those three young men are devoid of humanity and are a prime example as to why I carry a gun. No, I am absolutely not saying that Mr. Lane would be alive today if he had been. Honestly, it probably wouldn’t have changed anything. What I am saying is that evil is real and must be resisted at every opportunity. This serves as a reminder that there are monsters among us, and they are dressed in human skin.

Vigilantes!

Kevin over at The Smallest Minority brings us the story of a pair of young men that took the law into their own hands and followed a suspected criminal.

Temar

Temar Boggs and a friend didn’t wait for police but instead followed the suspicious vehicle for 15 minutes. Finally intimidating the suspect enough that he let the little girl that he had abducted go.

Jocelyn

Wannabe cop? Vigilante?

Or hero?

hero

Good job, Temar. In a just world, you’d be the one people were comparing to their own sons.