PINK!!! Deviled Eggs

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Do not attempt to adjust your set. The colors in this post are true. It really is that PINK. The surface it is sitting on is actually blue.

So I mentioned that we recently discovered pickled eggs and promised you pictures. We bought some high quality large (not extra large or jumbo) eggs from the local grocery store. We let them sit in the refrigerator for about a week and then boiled and peeled them. Fresh eggs are awesome for frying, not so awesome for boiling. Be patient. We pickled 16.

We started with three fresh beets which we wrapped tightly in aluminum foil and roasted for approximately an hour and a half. They should squish a little almost like a baked potato. Leave them wrapped and set them on the kitchen counter until they reach room temperature. At this point, we put them in the fridge overnight, but I’m pretty sure you could skip that.

I understand that you can use canned beets, but I liked starting with fresh. Your mileage may vary.

When you unwrap the beets, hold them over something because they will be juicy and that juice will stain. Once they are unwrapped, they should peel easily. It will just slip off. Again, be very careful not to drip it on your pants or shoes. Cut them into smallish chunks. They will go in the jar with the eggs.

The construction of the jar should be some boiled peeled eggs, some roasted beets, some garlic, more eggs, etc. Just keep it mixed up. We also added some dried dill weed.

Like with any pickle process, bring your salt and vinegar mixture to a boil, then pour it into the jar. Place the lid and ring and let it sit on the counter until it reaches room temperature. the lid will very likely pop, but since this is a very low acid recipe, you cannot make it safely shelf stable without a pressure canner. It’s alright, we’re going to eat them soon. Once they reach room temperature, stick them in the refrigerator. Leave them no less than four days. Ours sat for ten. Ten days allows for the color to really penetrate the eggs. Which makes them come out of the jar looking like this.

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That color? It goes all the way to the yolk

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You can eat them just like this and they are delicious. We may have sampled one. Maybe.

Drop your yolks into a bowl and set your halves up for filling.

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For deviled eggs, I like for my creamy ingredients to be a generous third of the volume of the yolks. Most of that should be honest to goodness mayonnaise. Miracle Whip is an abomination and if you try and substitute it, I don’t think we can be friends anymore. My feelings on Miracle Whip can be summed up here. The rest is ranch dressing. I know, bear with me. Maybe that’s the native Okie. For my dry ingredients, I use a few good clumps of mustard powder and some cracked pepper. (I really like to go ahead and add some wasabi powder here, but I knew there were people I would be serving them to that can’t rock the wasabi). We’d normally add salt to deviled eggs, but the pickled eggs are plenty salty enough already.

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Mix the filling until it looks like you are going to ice a pretty, pretty princess cake. It helps to put it into a bag that you can use like a pastry bag for egg filling.

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Garnish with some bacon. Because bacon.

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You can even put a little dollop of wasabi on the tops of some of them as in the first picture. And then you just might want to lick the bowl clean.

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And there you have it. Hot pink deviled eggs.

5 thoughts on “PINK!!! Deviled Eggs”

  1. I jarred 5 dozen pickled eggs on the weekend, though not the beet colored variety.

    I keep tabs on my local egg supplier for when he’s got a new batch of layers in. The young hens lay small (peewee) eggs first then they get progressively larger. I buy the peewee’s for $1/flat (2.5 dozen). They make great snack size pickles and you can get more in a jar.

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